New education

The current system was designed and conceived for a different age: in the intellectual culture of the enlightenment and the economic circumstances of the industrial revolution.[02:06]

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Spare raspberries go to a good home

More on localised food production, but this time it’s the social and economic benefits that I’m concerned about…

Last year I bought some Summer-fruiting raspberries (Glen Ample) which I planted down the allotment. Bought 10 but realistically there’s only space for 7 in the plot, so I expected that a couple would not take and I’d be fine. But they all rooted successfully and have been growing well for a year, and I have 3 spare. Offered them to friends and then spent a couple of pleasurable hours yesterday morning transplanting the canes from the plot to their house. On the way out of the allotment, I also took 3 quick blackcurrant cuttings for them.

3 raspberries

3 raspberries

The rasps are on a nice South-West facing fence and I think they’ll do very well, and the blackcurrants will take a year to get established and then moved to their final position. Give it a couple of years and there should be a good crop of rasps and blackcurrants to complement their existing apple tree. Which reminds me: I got a cuppa and a bag of apples to take home — a nice gesture.

I’ve got a hunch that a mature fruit-producing garden, or any kind of productive garden, will add value to a house. Not found any research to back this up (I’ve not looked) but I did see some research from Portland, Oregon which indicates house prices rise when there are trees in the garden or on street. More research needed for the UK situation, I think.